Gentle Cleansing with Hato Mugi

HATO MUGI SPRING STEW

I decided to go a bit Asian with my menu and cook with Job’s Tears—in Japanese “Hato Mugi.”  Hato Mugi resembles barley and is sometimes called “Pearl” (not “pearled”) barley. But it is actually not related to the grain known as “barley.”

Hato Mugi is great for spring because it is said to be a cleansing grain. I am not into big, dramatic cleanses or fasts for spring but prefer to adjust my cooking, starting in early February, toward spring and toward not only lightening up the menu, but choosing foods that do help the body get rid of excess fats, dairy and other animal products that may have been consumed over the winter.

Hato Mugi is an ancient grain that has not been hybridized as far as I know and it is gluten-free.

It is purchased dried and should be soaked for as long as twelve hours to make cooking easier. Before you cook Hato Mugi, sort through the dried grains for any dirt or stones or whatever. Wash it quickly in cold water and then soak it in spring water until it has expanded and softened somewhat.

I am using some other mildly cleansing foods with this dish including kombu seaweed and shiitake mushrooms—both of these can help break down excess fat and dairy.

Hato Mugi has a rich, earthy flavor and I love to pair it with young spring vegetables such as leeks, scallions or dandelion greens.

Hato Mugi Spring Stew

  • 6 inch piece of dried kombu seaweed
  • 1 cup of Hato Mugi (Job’s Tears)
  • several dried shiitake mushrooms
  • 1 carrot, diced
  • 1 cup of cooked black beans
  • shoyu (soy sauce)

There’s a lot of soaking you’ll need to do in advance.  Sort through the hato mugi removing any stones or other items that don’t belong (yes it does sometimes happen!) and then wash thoroughly in cold water. Soak the hato mugi in spring water for several hours. Overnight is fine.

Brush off the dried kombu and soak it in a medium-sized pot in a little spring water. The kombu will expand as it softens. When it has done that (takes maybe 10 minutes) then remove it from the pot leaving the soaking water there. Cut the kombu into bitesize pieces (any shape you like—squares, strips, etc.) and put the cut kombu back into the bottom of the pot.

The mushrooms also get soaked in spring water. I just grab a small bowl for that. When the mushrooms are soft enough to slice, remove any stem parts because they are tough and don’t soften in cooking. Then cut the shiitake up into bite size strips.

While things are soaking you can wash and dice a large carrot.

Next is the cooking method which is layering:  the kombu is at the bottom along with the water you soaked it in, then add the shiitake mushrooms and you can use that soaking water too, then the hato mugi on top of that. Cover with water and bring to a boil, then turn down the heat and let it all simmer with a lid on it. Cook it for about 30 minutes. You don’t stir it around, you leave it cooking in layers. If the water cooks away but the dish is not finished you can add a little more water.

Toward the end of cooking is when I like to add the carrots because in spring and summer I’m not looking for stewy soft vegetables. I like the carrots to keep their bright color and cook until just soft enough to fit in with the other ingredients..

I used a can of organic cooked black beans for this and added one cup at the end of the cooking time so the beans would heat up.

Once everything is done, season with some soy sauce and now you can stir it up to distribute the seasoning.

Garnish with some ginger, some parsley, slivers of scallion or whatever you wish. I did serve this with a side of fresh spring dandelion greens sauteed in olive oil and garlic and a side of salad.

Hearty and filling, yet not heavy.

Where to buy Hato Mugi?

I have seen hato mugi in Asian grocery stores but I can never tell for sure if it is organic. My primary requirement for food is that it is labeled organic which also encompasses the question of whether it is GMO (Genetically Modified Organism). Organic includes being non-GMO.

My local natural food stores don’t carry hato mugi. If there is a store near you that has a really good selection of macrobiotic foods, you might find it there. Otherwise I highly recommend ordering online from Gold Mine Natural Foods. They have all the good healthy stuff that the commercial natural food stores are no longer willing to carry. This is because enough of us aren’t demanding the very highest quality and variety of foods and so they don’t use shelf space for it. But it doesn’t hurt to continually ask for things to be brought in and create a little ruckus over the fact that natural food stores (not naming names but you probably know which ones) are becoming more and more “homogenized” — to put it politely.

It’s easy to say, “They are only interested in making money.” Well, of course they are. It’s a business and they are supporting as much of the healthy choices as they can and still make a profit. But that’s the point. They are CHOICES as in, yours and mine. If we don’t choose healthy, there is no way the stores are going to be able to make money stocking healthy. Right?

Balancing with Sea Veggies

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I don’t know about you but around here, the long sultry summer has announced its arrival and I’ve been preparing. How? By lightening up my cooking over the past weeks and infusing more fresh, crisp, biting crunch to the menu.

That is one way to be in balance during the hot season. But that doesn’t mean you can’t have some of the old summertime favorites like potato salad. Of course you can! I just make a few changes that lighten it up and let it help me and my family to feel refreshed and ready to play The Healthy Cooking Game despite the heat.

One of the foods I use to create balance in our diet is sea vegetables. They are awesome sources of naturally occurring minerals and trace minerals. By using sea vegetables you can accomplish so much in such a delicious way.

If you are thinking, “Eeeeewe!  Sea Weed?” don’t panic. Yes. I am talking about seaweed–a traditional food in many parts of the world. Sea VEGGIES, as I prefer to call them, are not only great sources of minerals, some are awesome antioxidants too. They help balance excess protein and fat you may have consumed and help the body to get rid of that excess. If you have been indulging in dairy foods, you will find eating sea vegetables will help your body eventually get rid of that excess too.

You may also already know that eating sugar can deplete your body of minerals faster than you can say “Cherry Garcia,” and sea veggies are very effective in getting minerals back in.

Because of these excesses, you may not like the taste of sea veggies now as much as you will when you are more balanced. So here’s a great little purple-red sea veggie to start with.

Dulse is a mild tasting sea vegetable chock full of minerals and antioxidants. Did you ever get a little washed out from sweating in the heat of summer? Dulse will replenish your potassium.

Here’s how I put all this good data to use in my potato salad recipe:

Wash, slice and boil your potatoes until they are cooked but still firm and cool them down. Add all the other veggies and whisk up the lemon juice, olive oil, umeboshi vinegar and pepper. (Umeboshi vinegar is both salty and sour so you won’t need to add salt to this. Also there is sodium in dulse.) Dress the salad and mix in the dulse flakes.

Truly yummy!

The Healthy Cooking Game is a series of posts about finding what is right for you to eat so you can achieve your dietary goals. It is not about making anyone’s diet wrong or telling you what you have to eat to be healthy. It is a guide for creating balance in your menus and being able to make the changes you want to make. The Healthy Cooking Game is a project that I have undertaken with my friend, Kate Ryan, who is a truly talented cook and food consultant.

The Healthy Cooking Game

It’s Breakfast Time

It’s Breakfast Time!

SCRAMBLED TOFU BREAKFAST

Good Morning!

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A big part of The Healthy Cooking Game is that in order to play like the pros, you need to start finding out what foods do for you.  

Huh?  What foods do? Don’t they get somewhat chewed up and digested and, voila! You don’t need any more for a little while?

Yes. Yes, that’s right in the most basic sense. But there’s so much more to know! Take breakfast for instance. If you eat eggs, do you know what they do for you?

The Incredible Edible Egg website says an egg has about 6.2 grams of protein, 4.8 grams of fat (1.6 of that is saturated), 186 grams of cholesterol and a few vitamins and minerals. But the nutritional data is not the only thing I’m talking about.

Eggs are a very concentrated food. After all, a fertilized egg is the beginning of an entire chicken. Technically speaking, you could consider an egg to be a whole food for that reason. When a food is so concentrated with fat and protein, it takes much longer to digest and in order for your body to really break it down to become useful, you’ve got to be able to balance that egg with things that help with that breakdown and assimilation. (Cruelly, bacon, hash browns and pancakes with butter and syrup just don’t do the trick.)

I would think that in order to create BALANCE with an egg, you would eat at least 3-4 times the volume of dark leafy greens and other vegetables. You might want to know what veggies are really great for helping to break down that fat, too. Like shiitake mushrooms and daikon radish. Or that throwing in some ginger, onions and garlic could be helpful.

But are you sure you would want to eat that egg? Lately I’ve been very concientious about not eating foods that are genetically modified (GMO). You probably know that corn and corn products are big GMO foods unless they’re organic or officially labeled “non-GMO.”

Try going to the natural food store and finding eggs that you can be 100% certain have not come from chickens who were fed any GMO corn or other feed. You’ll see all kinds of “free-range,” “naturally fed,” and “from down on the farm.”  In order to be truly GMO-free, your egg has got to be organic and so does the chicken it came from and so does the food the chicken ate. They are there on the shelves too, for a price. You’ve really got to read that carton to be sure what you’re getting!

Why not skip all that worry and have your scramble and your balance?

Scrambled Tofu

Serves Two

  • 8 oz of firm organic tofu (I prefer sprouted tofu—very digestible)
  • 1 large shallot, sliced thin
  • 1 cup of diced yellow summer squash
  • 1/2 cup of fresh chopped parsley
  • tumeric
  • red chili pepper flakes (optional)
  • olive oil
  • sea salt

Put about a tablespoon of olive oil into a heavy skillet and let it start heating up while adding the shallots. Add a pinch of sea salt here to bring out the flavor of the shallots. When the shallots are translucent and pretty soft (they will have a very sweet taste cooked this way) add your diced yellow squash and another pinch of salt and stir fry that for a minute or two.

Add the tumeric – about a half teaspoon. The tumeric will release a bright yellow color and you want that because when you add your tofu, it will become yellow too—just like scrambled eggs!

Take your tofu and squish it up with your hands so it looks like scrambled eggs and drop it into the pan. I love adding the chili pepper flakes at this point. Season the tofu with some sea salt. Stir the tofu around until it has become a lovely, “eggy” color.

Throw in the parsley at the end and turn off the heat. The parsley will cook a tiny bit with the heat already in the pan/food but will stay bright green. So pretty!

And what, hopefully you are asking, will scrambled tofu DO for me?

Four oz of tofu—such as one serving of this delicious recipe—contains about 10 grams of protein, 5 grams of fat and zero cholesterol! (Sorry egg people, you’re just not all that incredible.)  Tofu has many phytonutrients and known minerals and vitamins naturally occurring. Tofu is also highly digestible and won’t take hours like the egg will. (Note though, that soy beans are another crop that is pretty much across-the-board GMO unless it is certified organic.)

And the rest? Veggies including green parsley for additional vitamins and minerals and blood-cleansing chlorophyl. Plus fiber! Sea salt cooked in the food and not added on top of food at the table helps break down the food and make it taste sweeter and more delicious. Turmeric is well-known as a super hero in fighting inflammation. Plus it contributes a lovely yellow color! Chili pepper flakes are one of my favorite ways to get a little hot taste and help get the ol’ circulation going.

Talk about Breakfast of Champions!

Cauliflower Cassoulet

Hello!  Spring is here and I have emerged from hibernation. Over the last three months we have been moving our household and getting the new place set up. I am loving my new kitchen that actually has counter space, cabinet space, pantry space and a lot of other great features.

I’ve been inspired, cooking-wise to create some new things! Here is a great dish for transitioning from winter to spring. It has just enough warmth and comfort food quality to satisfy when the air chills at night and just enough lightness and freshness to energize us.

Cauliflower Cassoulet

  • 1 head of cauliflower
  • 2 cups chopped fresh parsely
  • 1-2 shallots
  • 2-3 tablespoons sweet white miso
  • 1 umeboshi plum
  • whole wheat bread crumbs (or if you can’t eat wheat, use roughly ground almonds or non-gluten crumbs)
  • herbs of choice–I used oregano, garlic powder, sea salt, pepper, crushed anise seeds, celery seeds
  • olive oil
  • (Optional) vegan shredded mozarella
CAULIFLOWER CASSOULET INGREDIENTS

I started out with a head of cauliflower I wanted to use and looked through my refrigerator and pantry for some likely ingredients. I decided on a tofu cream sauce, shallots and parsley. On the left there are umeboshi plums–a Japanese traditional pickled plum that has both a salty and a sour taste. On the right in the little tub is sweet white miso–another traditional Japanese delight made with fermented soybeans.

TOFU CREAM SAUCE

Combine a package of firm tofu with 2-3 tablespoons of sweet white miso and the meat of an umeboshi plum. If you don’t want to try umeboshi plums, you can substitute a bit of red wine vinegar and a little sea salt. Blend these up until you have a creamy sauce. You can add a little water if the mixture seems too thick.

SWEAT THE SHALLOTS

Slice 1 or 2 shallots and put them into a hot pan with some olive oil and a pinch of sea salt. You just need to sweat them a little. They glisten with the oil but will not be completely limp.

CAULIFLOWER WITH SHALLOT AND PARSLEY

Blanch pieces of cauliflower for a minute or two, chop up parsley and add the cooked shallots.  Oil a casserole or baking dish and put the veggies in.

CUSTOM BREAD CRUMB TOPPING

Customize your bread crumb topping. I used whole wheat bread crumbs and seasoned it with salt, pepper and herbs/spices of choice. I prefer seasoning bread crumbs myself so I can control the amount of salt and the taste. Can’t do whole wheat? Try topping with roughly ground almonds or gluten-free bread crumbs.

READY FOR THE OVEN

Pour your tofu cream sauce evenly over the veggies.

Sprinkle the crumb topping over the top of the cassoulet.

You’re ready to bake at 350 for about 35-40 minutes or until the cauliflower is soft and everything is all bubbly good.  The last five minutes of baking, I added a sprinkle of vegan shredded mozarella. Vegan cheeses don’t appeal to me a great deal but they look nice as a garnish sometimes and they help when your family is transitioning away from dairy foods. Just know that vegan cheese is basically congealed oil and doesn’t have a lot of flavor on its own.

FINISHED

Finished! Very delicious and very satisfying served with a salad.

Under De-Construction

Nothing like moving your household to disrupt things thoroughly! Not that I’m complaining. This is a move I’ve been waiting for a long, long time! My husband and I have finally decided to put apartment life in the past and we are buying a home of our own. (WAIT ’til I show you my new kitchen!!!)

Christmas packages have been replaced with boxes. Cupboards and drawers are starting to be emptied. Blogging time is mostly replaced with dekludging time. And more dekludging time, and still more . . . Nothing better than moving to take the opportunity to get rid of some of the burden!

With my schedule, there is only less than a day each week to get everything done. Cooking has become fast and minimal. Nothing fancy, just something to eat. Not exactly your gourmet, unique, photo-worthy delicacies. Not the kind of thing you blog about.

Or is it? Last fall I started to write a post that I called, “What you don’t see.” It was going to be about our day to day fare that isn’t special or unusual—just all the things that are made and eaten in between the masterpieces.

Now seems like the perfect time to share these with you while I pack and tape and label my material life. Cookbooks are in a box and shortly so will be most of the utensils and dishes. Life and menus are literally under deconstruction. But we still have to eat, don’t we?

BASIC MISO SOUP PAINT

Miso soup—the breakfast of healthy champions! This is absolutely one of the rock solid foundations of our daily fare. Alkalizing, loaded with beneficial bacteria from naturally fermented miso (as long as you don’t boil this soup), and a great way to use up bits of veggies you have in your refrigerator. This one has some red radishes that needed using. Takes just a few minutes and I usually make enough for the next few mornings. I’ve given the recipe for Miso Soup before, so I’ll just post the link here.

Creamy Celery Root Soup

Sometimes when you meet a new vegetable, you take one look and think you know what it’s going to be like.

Take this celery root for example. This is the same one we saw last week.

CELERY ROOT CLOSE UP

Interesting looking . . . different in a big brown sort of way . . . not something you’re supposed to actually cook, right?

Yes!! Yes!! It is something you’re supposed to cook—eat—and you’ll love it!

Creamy Celery Root Soup

  • Two or three large celery roots (AKA celeriac)
  • Mirepoix (fine diced onions, celery and carrots)
  • garlic
  • olive oil
  • salt & pepper
  • pinch of crushed anise seeds
  • coconut milk
  • soup stock of choice

Peel all the brown skin off the celery root and remove any dark spots or ingrown roots. Cut the peeled roots into 1-inch chunks.  Steam the celery root in a little water until it is tender. Blend the steamed celery roots with a little coconut milk. I use a power blender to get a super creamy consistency but any blender will work fine as long as you blend it long enough.

Saute the mirepoix in olive oil and sea salt and add some soup broth – start with about a cup.  I used a simple broth of kombu seaweed simmered in spring water because I wanted a mild broth that would not overwhelm the taste of the celery root.  Add in the garlic, the anise seeds. Add more salt, pepper, broth and or coconut milk until you get your desired thickness and taste.

You will have the richest, thickest soup with a sweet and delicate flavor!

CELERY ROOT SOUP

Pumpkin Swirl Dark Chocolate Mousse

October has had it’s own lovely messages telling us the autumn season is in full swing. October shows us wonderful changes everywhere—not just in the trees and not just colorful hues. Sometimes October shows us fluffiness!

FLUFFY PLANT

Around here, October shows us floatiness, too! Being outside in the crisp fall air is conducive to dropping in and saying “Hello” to folks!

BALLOON UP CLOSE 2

October brings us orange things too.

BITTERSWEETPAINT

And Halloweeny things.

HALLOWEEN TREES

And harvesty things.

free_plenty_of_pumpkins_wallpaper-426951-1286854509

You see where I’m going here? These are just the inspiration I need for October edition of Mousse!

PUMPKIN CHOCOLATE SWIRL MOUSSE

Pumpkin Swirl Dark Chocolate Mousse – Serves 8

This is incredibly simple to make! Start off with a batch of tofu-based dark chocolate mousse:

  • 12 ounces silken tofu
  • 2/3 cup 100% cocoa
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla
  • 1 cup pitted Medjool dates
  • 1/4 cup coconut milk or more, as needed, for desired thickness

Blend it all up and put it in the refrigerator in a covered container. Then blend up the pumpkin part.

  • 15 oz pumpkin puree
  • 12 ounces silken tofu
  • 1/2 cup maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 tablespoon pumpkin pie spice
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 tablespoon tapioca flour

Watch those spices! They can easily be too much. Taste and adjust and be sure to refrigerate this mousse for at least half an hour in a covered container. You will find that the cinnamon and pumpkin pie spices need some time to blend themselves in and become “one” with the mousse. Then you can play with the two mousses any way you want!

Results:  I liked the pumpkin mousse but only after it sat overnight in the refrigerator, When it was just freshly made, the spices overwhelmed the pumpkin flavor.

Hubbin’ — not feeling the pumpkin love.

Neither of us liked our first serving which had about equal amounts of dark chocolate and pumpkin.

I put the next serving together with a little dark chocolate mousse in the bottom of the dish, then the pumpkin and then a small swirl of the chocolate on top. Much better! I decided on a garnish of chopped roasted, salted pistachio nuts. Skin them so you get the green color.

At this rate, my pumpkin will be gone before the dark chocolate mousse is used up, That’ll be just fine for my Hubbin’! In fact, I’d be very happy with just the pumpkin mousse which is far lighter.

Coffeecake With Benefits

COFFEE CAKE WITH BENEFITS

Good Morning Friday!

Sure would love to make a special treat for my Hubbin’ and me. Is it possible to bake something delightful without losing the “lighten it up” factor? Something to compete with the sugar-laden pastries at the coffee shop? Of course it is!

I took an already outstanding recipe for vegan coffeecake and added a twist. I usually use some kind of fruit with this. Fruit is good, sure, but what if I want even more fiber and want to sneak even more veggies into the day?

Spaghetti Squash Coffeecake

Cake

  • 2 C whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1/2 Tsp sea salt
  • 1 1/2 Tsp baking powder
  • 1 Tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 C light oil (I use avocado)
  • 1/2 C brown rice syrup
  • 1 Tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/4 Tsp turmeric (optional)
  • 1/2 – 2/3 C unsweetened vanilla almond milk
  • 1 1/2 C cooked, chopped spaghetti squash
  • 1/2 cup of diced apples, berries or other fruit

Topping

  • 3 Tbs maple granules
  • 3 Tbs chopped toasted walnuts
  • cinnamon

Sift the dry ingredients together, mix the wet ingredients except the squash and fruit together and then add the wet with into the dry and stir until incorporated. Do not over-mix this. Adjust the almond milk so you have a fairly thick batter – not runny. Add the squash and fruit—I chose a half cup of cranberries.. Pour into an oiled 6 X 10 or similar size baking dish. Make the topping and sprinkle it on top of the cake. Bake at 375 for about a half hour.

Dare you to let this cool completely on the rack before cutting into it! This is a wonderfully moist and satisfying breakfast cake.

Notes

  • I like using turmeric because of the nice yellow color it gives the cake and also because turmeric is beneficial as an anti-inflammatory.
  • You can use coconut sugar granules instead of maple granules.
  • You can make extra topping and layer it into both the middle and on top.
  • You can skip the fruit, add less sweetener and make this into a savory cake using herbs and spices. (SO many possibilities!)
  • The cake is based on a recipe from Christina Cooks which you can find here.

Simply Green

FRESH COLLARDS

In the cooler months, dark leafy greens start to show some muscle. Just look at these big collard greens! They’re dark, they’re hearty, and their chock full of calcium, vitamin A, vitamin K and many other vitamins and minerals.

Remove the stems (save for later) and lightly boil the whole, uncut leaves in water with a pinch of sea salt until they are just tender and still very bright. It is important not to overcook them. I look for them to be pliable but with lots of body,  Al dente!

Spread the leaves out on a flat tray or dish so they can cool without continuing to cook and soften.

READY TO ROLL

Use a sushi mat to roll the leaves. You’ll have to fold the leaves to fit the rectangular shape of the sushi mat.

ROLLED

Squeeze any excess liquid out of the rolls and slice them. Try angle slices as well as straight ones. I like to dot each section with umeboshi plum paste, giving the greens a salty and sour garnish and a punch of beautiful red color!  Power-packed bite-sized deliciousness. Enjoy!

Sweet and Savory Root Vegetable Casserole

When I was driving to my natural food store this afternoon to do my weekly shopping, I was thinking about turnips and cranberries.

You know how it is — you get some stubborn ingredient in your head and you have no idea what you’ll do with it, but nevertheless, there it is waiting to become your latest creation.

Sweet and Savory Root Vegetable Casserole

I don’t usually go for “casseroles,” but I didn’t know what else to call this. It’s not exactly a pie even though it does have a bottom crust.

You can leave out the crust altogether if you want to. I included it because I am busy over here making vegetable dishes more appealing to my Hubbin’ who generally loves the food I make for him. I also included it because I didn’t want a heavy, gooey filling. Instead, the crust kept the dish somewhat together.

As you know, I use organic ingredients whenever possible.

  • Whole wheat single pastry crust of your choice, uncooked
  • 2 Medium turnips
  • 1 Yam
  • 1 Yellow onion diced
  • 1 Cup Cranberries
  • 1 Granny Smith apple diced
  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil
  • Sea Salt
  • Cinnamon
  • Nutmeg
  • 1 1/2 Cups toasted Walnuts
  • Fresh thyme

Slice the turnips and yam into half-inch slices. Pre-steam them (just plain – no salt or seasonings) for about 12 minutes until they are tender but not falling apart.

Mix the diced onions, cranberries and apple with olive oil, salt, nutmeg and cinnamon and spread them on a baking dish in a single layer. Roast them in an oven at 350 degrees, turning them every so often so they are evenly done, about half an hour.

Roast the diced onions and green apple and the cranberries in olive oil, sea salt, cinnamon and nutmeg for about 30 minutes.
Roast the diced onions, green apple and the cranberries in olive oil, sea salt, cinnamon and nutmeg for about 30 minutes.

Grind the toasted walnuts to a rough crumble – about 3 pulses in a processor or 10 seconds on a low speed in the Vitamix. Or just chop them up. Mix the ground walnuts into the roasted onion/apple/cranberry mixture.

Layer the turnips onto the crust, then a layer of the onion/fruit/walnut mix. A layer of yams next and then the rest of the onion/fruit/walnut mix. Sprinkle fresh thyme on top. All seasonings are according to your taste! Some of you know what you like and the rest of you will become much better cooks if you start using your own intuition and knowingness and find out what you like.  😉

You can also use other kinds of root vegetables. As you know, I had turnips on the brain today.

Bake the casserole for 15 – 18 minutes until the crust is done. That’s the advantage of pre-steaming the root veggies—it doesn’t have to bake for long. Let the casserole sit for a few minutes before slicing it.

The result? Very satisfying yet not heavy and overly filling. Loved the tart accent from the cranberries!
The result? Very satisfying yet not heavy and overly filling. Loved the tart accent from the cranberries!

I served mine with Brown Rice and Hokkaido Azuki Beans, Very Lightly Boiled Kale and a side of Sauerkraut. Perfect Sunday Supper!.