Balancing with Sea Veggies

cooking game logo

I don’t know about you but around here, the long sultry summer has announced its arrival and I’ve been preparing. How? By lightening up my cooking over the past weeks and infusing more fresh, crisp, biting crunch to the menu.

That is one way to be in balance during the hot season. But that doesn’t mean you can’t have some of the old summertime favorites like potato salad. Of course you can! I just make a few changes that lighten it up and let it help me and my family to feel refreshed and ready to play The Healthy Cooking Game despite the heat.

One of the foods I use to create balance in our diet is sea vegetables. They are awesome sources of naturally occurring minerals and trace minerals. By using sea vegetables you can accomplish so much in such a delicious way.

If you are thinking, “Eeeeewe!  Sea Weed?” don’t panic. Yes. I am talking about seaweed–a traditional food in many parts of the world. Sea VEGGIES, as I prefer to call them, are not only great sources of minerals, some are awesome antioxidants too. They help balance excess protein and fat you may have consumed and help the body to get rid of that excess. If you have been indulging in dairy foods, you will find eating sea vegetables will help your body eventually get rid of that excess too.

You may also already know that eating sugar can deplete your body of minerals faster than you can say “Cherry Garcia,” and sea veggies are very effective in getting minerals back in.

Because of these excesses, you may not like the taste of sea veggies now as much as you will when you are more balanced. So here’s a great little purple-red sea veggie to start with.

Dulse is a mild tasting sea vegetable chock full of minerals and antioxidants. Did you ever get a little washed out from sweating in the heat of summer? Dulse will replenish your potassium.

Here’s how I put all this good data to use in my potato salad recipe:

Wash, slice and boil your potatoes until they are cooked but still firm and cool them down. Add all the other veggies and whisk up the lemon juice, olive oil, umeboshi vinegar and pepper. (Umeboshi vinegar is both salty and sour so you won’t need to add salt to this. Also there is sodium in dulse.) Dress the salad and mix in the dulse flakes.

Truly yummy!

The Healthy Cooking Game is a series of posts about finding what is right for you to eat so you can achieve your dietary goals. It is not about making anyone’s diet wrong or telling you what you have to eat to be healthy. It is a guide for creating balance in your menus and being able to make the changes you want to make. The Healthy Cooking Game is a project that I have undertaken with my friend, Kate Ryan, who is a truly talented cook and food consultant.

The Healthy Cooking Game

It’s Breakfast Time

Advertisements

Summer Salad Time!

Moon Rising on a Hot New Mexico Afternoon

When the mercury rises and the daylight stretches out in the evening, I’m not interested in turning on my oven and I don’t even want to spend much time at the stove.  I prefer to spend my time enjoying the beautiful weather outside and staying cool when I’m inside.

My husband and I like to make sure we take extra minerals to replace what we’re losing when we sweat and to keep us feeling good even in high heat.  My husband takes salt and potassium while I usually just take a little potassium.

But what I like even better is adding more sea vegetables to my diet.  Sea vegetables provide a great source of minerals and trace minerals in a highly assimilable form.  That is because the plant has already converted the minerals from the earth or sea for us.

Cooking with sea vegetables can be quite easy.  If you aren’t familiar with using them, then I suggest you take a look at some cookbook recipes to get some ideas.  To get you started, here are a couple of my favorite summer salads using sea vegetables.

Rather than repeat this each time I list an ingredient, I will just say here that I only recommend using certified organic vegetables wherever possible.  I will also tell you that when choosing your vegetables, the biggest is not necessarily the best.  Super big veggies do not have the flavor that smaller ones do.  For instance if I am picking out cucumbers, I’m going to go for one that is not really fat.  The fat ones are more seedy and watery and have less flavor.  I would choose one that is more compact.

I will also remind you that it is far more adventurous to consider the recipe as a guide and play around with the ingredients and proportions until you get what you like best!  However I really do make and test-taste any recipe I give you, so you aren’t going to go wrong following them even if you decide to tweak them here and there according to your own preferences.

 ~~~~~

BETTER THAN AT THE SUSHI BAR SUNOMONO

  • 2 ripe cucumbers or about 3 cups sliced
  • Wakame sea vegetable flakes
  • 2 Tbs brown rice vinegar
  • salt
  • 2 tsps mirin (I recommend naturally brewed and aged with no added sugar or synthetics enzymes)
  • 1Tble toasted sesame oil
  • A sprinkle of toasted black or light sesame seeds

Refreshing!

Wash the cucumbers and slice them lengthwise.  You do not have to peel them if they are organic.  Take a spoon and scoop out the seeds.  There is nothing wrong with leaving the seeds in, but this is a slight refinement that I feel makes this particular salad more appealing.

With a sharp vegetable knife, slice the cucumbers at an angle as paper-thin as possible.  [Note:  I find that trying to use a mandolin or some other slicer-dicer gadget is unworkable and annoying.  They don’t compare to a using an excellent-quality, sharp knife.]

Put the cucumber slices into a bowl and sprinkle them with the salt and mix it up.  The salt will start to draw some of the water out of the cucumber and that’s what you want.  You are ever-so-slightly pickling them.  Let the cucumbers sit that way while you prepare the dressing—about 20 minutes.

Drain off the excess water from the cucumbers and salt.  Taste a slice of cucumber and if it tastes salty you can quickly rinse them in cold water.   Combine the rice vinegar, mirin and toasted sesame oil for your dressing and mix it into the cucumbers.  Add in the wakame flakes and give them time to reconstitute into bigger soft pieces.  Serve with a few toasted sesame seeds sprinkled on top.

~~~~~~

NOT YOUR MAMA’S POTATO SALAD (Unless you’re one of my kids!)

  • 1 1/2 pounds red-skinned new potatoes (the smaller the better)
  • 1/4 cup diced celery
  • 1/4 cup diced red onion
  • 1 hard-boiled egg
  • 1/4 tsp celery Seed
  • 1/4 cup applewood smoked dulse
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 cup fresh squeezed lemon juice (about 2 lemons)
  • 2 tsps mustard powder
  • pinch of garlic powder (I love fresh garlic but I found it is too overwhelming in this salad)
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 Tbs brown rice syrup or sweetener of your choice

If you don’t already have your egg hardboiled, do that first.  You’ll want the egg to cool down before adding it into the potato salad.

Wash the potatoes and cut them into bite-size pieces.  I like getting the smallest red potatoes I can find because they are less starchy and more sweet-tasting.  I cut them in halves or quarters if they are bigger so they will cook in about the same amount of time.  Bring water and a pinch of salt to a boil and cook your potatoes until they are tender enough to poke with a fork but not falling apart.  If you need to, you can take them out of the water when they’re done and rinse them in cold water to stop the cooking.

While the potatoes are cooling down, wash and dice the onions and celery.  Assemble the salad by combining the potatoes, diced hardboiled egg, celery, onions and celery seed in a bowl.  Make the dressing by mixing the sesame oil, mustard , lemon juice, salt and pepper together adjusting the seasoning to suit your tastes.  This is a simple dressing, but you certainly can add more herbs or spices as you desire.  Add the dressing to the salad.  Break up the dulse into bite-size pieces (or I often cut it with scissors) and add that to the salad and combine it all together.  The dulse will easily reconstitute.

~~~~~

Look for these special ingredients in your natural foods store.  I don’t recommend going to the asian food market unless you are able to read the ingredient labels.  The asian food stores will have items like mirin and sea vegetables, but they are not usually naturally brewed or dried and they may have sugar and other unwanted additives.  I also like to order online or from a company called Gold Mine Natural Foods for things I can’t get locally.

The Pot Thickens

FOUR WAYS TO ENRICH YOUR MENU

Are you wishing you could eat a nice, thick, creamy bowl of soup without sacrificing your diet? Does your mouth water when you see smooth, rich desserts even though you know you shouldn’t indulge? Do you “pass” on the gravy?

Let me show you some ways to enjoy rich, thick textures in your meals that are guilt-free and nutritious without cramping your style. These methods can be used by anyone even though my particular recipes here are vegetarian.

1. Agar Flakes: You might recognize the name “agar agar” as something used in laboratory experiments and you’re right—it is used in petri dishes. Agar comes from seaweed. Food-quality agar is usually a blend of sea vegetables that have strong thickening properties. Agar is great for making gelatin-type dishes like aspics, desserts and pie fillings and it can be molded. It also comes in bars but I much prefer the flakes because they are so much faster and easier to use. To use agar flakes, add them to hot liquid and stir often until it is dissolved. Stirring helps prevent it from getting too thick and sticking to the bottom of the pot. Once the agar flakes are dissolved and have simmered about ten minutes, the mixture will thicken as it cools down. For the best taste and consistency, let your agar-gelled dish cool down outside of the refrigerator so it doesn’t get rubbery. After it is cooled, you can refrigerate it, covered. Like all sea vegetables, agar contains minerals–sodium, potassium, calcium, iodine, magnesium and iron are some. Agar is also considered to have medicinal properties and may relieve constipation if eaten several days in a row. Agar is good for vegetarians and vegans to know about as a replacement for gelatin which comes from pigs’ hooves or sometimes from other animals. If you are substituting agar flakes instead of gelatin in a recipe, you’ll need much less agar than you would gelatin.

One tablespoon of agar flakes has 10 mg of sodium, 10 mg of potassium, 1 gram of carbohydrate and 1 gram of dietary fiber. It has no calories, no fat and no cholesterol. Here is my favorite summer pie recipe using agar flakes:

Strawberry Blueberry Pie
(Given to me by Claire Kauffman from Meredith McCarty’s American Macrobiotic Cuisine with a few of my own notations)

• Single Pie Crust, baked and cooled. You can use pastry, graham cracker, etc.
• 2 Pints, Strawberries
• 1 Pint, Blueberries
• 1/2 tsp. sea salt
• 1/2 c cup rice syrup (you may substitute other sweeteners such as agave or honey and adjust for the right sweetness)
• 1/2 cup agar flakes

Wash all the fruit and remove the stems and leaves. Cut only the large strawberries in half and leave the rest whole. Put the strawberries in a pot, sprinkle them with sea salt and pour the syrup over them. Add the agar flakes. Cover and simmer until the agar flakes are dissolved.  This takes about 10 minutes.  Stir occasionally to gently combine the ingredients.  If necessary to get the agar fully dissolved, you may add a tablespoon or so of water.  No other liquid.  Add the blueberries for the last five minutes of cooking.  Pour the fruit mixture into the baked and cooled pie crust and let it set.

Strawberry Blueberry Pie

2. Kuzu: If you’ve ever been in the deep south of the U.S. you’ve probably seen these prolific vines with big leaves. They are so hardy and grow so fast they can take over an entire stand of trees in one season if they aren’t constantly cut back. The kind of kuzu (or kudzu) I use for cooking is a starch derived from the root of the plant. It comes from Japan in the form of white powdery lumps and is sometimes referred to as “wild arrowroot.” Kuzu can be used to thicken soups, sauces, desserts and even a hot drink. To use kuzu, crush the lumps up with the back of a spoon before measuring it and dissolve it in a little cool water or liquid first. You will need about a tablespoon of kuzu for every cup of liquid you want to thicken. When adding the dissolved kuzu into a hot liquid, stir constantly to prevent lumps. The dissolved kuzu will look cloudy at first, but as you stir and cook it will become clear. When it’s clear, it’s done. If the end result is not thick enough, add more kuzu. Add more liquid if your result is too thick. Kuzu does not have a strong flavor itself, so you can use it in many dishes without the kuzu interfering with the taste. Kuzu can be very soothing and is sometimes used in certain medicinal remedies for digestive troubles.

Српски / Srpski: Kuzu prah, koristi se u kuhin...

Image via Wikipedia

 One tablespoon of kuzu has about 30 calories, 8 grams of carbohydrate and 2 mg. of calcium. It has no fat, no cholesterol, no sodium and no sugars. Here is a very basic recipe for using kuzu to make a quick, soothing drink:

 Kuzu Apple Drink

Gently heat a cup of apple juice and a pinch of sea salt in a sauce pan. Bring this to just below a boil and take it off the burner. Dissolve about a teaspoon of kuzu powder in a quarter cup of water. Mix the kuzu and water into the apple juice while stirring constantly. Return the mixture to the stove and heat for a minute or so and serve. If you like, you can dress it up with a cinnamon stick.

3. Whole Grain Helper: We’ve all heard that eating whole grains is better for you. This is a great way to start incorporating them into your daily menu and introduce yourself and your family to the wide variety of types and uses for whole grains. I’m sure you aren’t new to the idea that cooking with grains can produce a thick and hearty soup or stew, such as a barley stew. Many grains can be used as thickeners including brown rice, oats, buckwheat and millet. Sometimes I use the whole grain and sometimes I use a milled or flaked version. An added plus is that when you use whole grains along with beans in a dish, you get what is known as a “complete protein.” In otherwords, a food that has all the needed requirements to provide good, useable protein to your body.

One of my favorite grains to thicken the pot with is millet. Millet is an ancient grain that comes from Africa and India. You might recognize the tiny yellow balls of millet in your favorite birdseed mix! Millet is an excellent grain for people to eat. To help you know more about millet, you can check out this information: http://chetday.com/millet.html .

One half cup of millet has approximately 378 calories, 4 grams fat, 8 grams fiber and 11 grams of protein. It has no sugars and is a decent source of iron. To demonstrate how grains can be used as a thickener, here is my recipe for hearty Navy Bean and Millet Soup:

Hearty Navy Bean and Millet Soup
Serves 6 – 8

Hearty Navy Bean and Millet Soup

• 2 cups of cooked or canned navy beans (If you use canned beans, I recommend organic ones that have been cooked with kombu seaweed. The seaweed makes the beans more digestible.)
• 1 quarter onion sliced ¼ inch thick
• 2 stalks of celery sliced
• 1 carrot cut in half moons. (Wash the carrot and slice it in half lengthwise. Then slice the halves on an angle, about ¼ inch thick.)
• 2 Tablespoons olive oil
• 1/2 cup millet
• 2 cups spring water
• 2 cloves garlic
Sea salt (You can add other spices and herbs that you like. Last night I used black pepper and oregano)
• Naturally brewed soy sauce

Put the millet into a bowl and rinse with cold water, draining the water off and rinsing again. Use your hand or a sieve to keep from losing the millet when you drain the water. Put the millet in a small pot with 2 cups of water and a pinch of sea salt and bring it to a boil. Simmer the millet until it is soft, 20-25 minutes. If the water is gone and the millet needs more cooking, just add more water. You want your millet to be soft and somewhat wet.

While the millet’s cooking, begin sautéing the other vegetables in a 3-4 quart pot. Heat the olive oil and sauté the onions first. Put in a pinch of sea salt and sauté the onions until they are translucent and sweet-smelling, then add carrots and another pinch of sea salt and sauté them. Last, add the celery, another pinch of salt and sauté that. Add four cups of water, your cooked beans and any seasonings or herbs and simmer for 20-30 minutes.

Blend the cooked millet until it is smooth and creamy. I like using an electric hand blender because you can blend right in the cooking pot and you’ll have less to clean up. Add the creamy millet and stir to incorporate it into the soup. If it is too thick, simply add a little bit more water. Season with a couple teaspoons of soy sauce. Voila! You have a thick, creamy protein-rich soup or stew. Serve with a garnish of parsley, sliced scallions or if you use dairy products, some grated parmesan cheese.

4. Reduction: Ooh La La! The very name “reduction sauce” sounds so haute cuisine! It is really very easy to make and can have a nearly unlimited variety of flavors. A reduction sauce is made by simmering liquids down in order to slightly thicken them and intensify their flavors. It is most often done after cooking meats by simmering the cooking juices with other things such as wine, vinegar, or cream and getting a very rich concentrated sauce. But reduction sauces are by no means limited to meat juices. You can reduce many kinds of liquids including fruit juice by simmering them in an open pan (no lid) and letting the liquid evaporate until you have the desired finished product.
Here is a recipe for Savory Mushroom Reduction Sauce:

 Savory Mushroom Reduction Sauce

• 6 medium portabella mushrooms, sliced
• 1 tablespoon olive oil
• 1 clove garlic, minced or crushed in a press
• Sea salt
• 2 tablespoons soy sauce
• 4 teaspoons balsamic vinegar
• 1 tablespoon of barley malt syrup (or substitute a small quantity of a sweetener of your choice)
• 1/2 cup of water

Heat the olive oil up in a heavy skillet and add the garlic, quickly followed by the mushrooms and a pinch of sea salt. Sauté the mushrooms until they start to get tender. Add balsamic vinegar, water, soy sauce and syrup or sweetener and stir to combine them. Let the mushrooms and liquid simmer until the sauce has thickened to your liking and turn off the heat. Use this as a sauce for grain dishes, cooked tofu dishes or steamed or boiled vegetables. I like it on steamed fresh green beans or asparagus.  This makes about a half cup, enough for 2-3 servings.

Asparagus with Mushroom Balsamic Reduction Sauce

I think you can see that these methods and ingredients for adding texture, richness and of course thickness to your menu are healthy and nutritious. They are useful for any type of diet—omnivore, vegetarian or vegan. You don’t have to rely on heavy cream, flour and butter when you’ve got these alternatives.

Purchase items such as kuzu, agar flakes, naturally brewed soy sauce and whole grains at a natural foods store or order them online if you can’t find them locally.

I’d love to hear about your experimentation with these ingredients and methods and if you want to share your own recipes, that would be wonderful too!

NEW!!

For additional free recipes using these techniques, you are invited to join PATTY’S CLUB!  Just go to my new Patty’s Club Page https://mycookinglife.com/pattys-club/ and follow the directions.